Older News

  • Spend summer preparing for the winter

    Electricity costs are consistently rising therefore it is becoming more and more important to find solutions to keeping the warmth inside your home. So why not take advantage of the beautiful weather we have coming up to make some changes to your...
  • The New Zealand Villa

    Villas were the most popular home design from the late 1800’s through to World War One. Nowadays the Villa is often the much-loved subject of kiwi renovators with its ornate features, character charm, and use of native timbers. Many Villas...
  • Art Deco Homes in New Zealand

    The art deco style first emerged in France prior to Word War 1, and by 1925 was increasingly popular internationally.  It began to appear in New Zealand in the 1930’s and marked a significant movement away from Villas and Bungalows. The...
  • Header Tanks & Hot Water Cylinders

    Hot water supply systems that were installed in the 1940s-60s most often had a ‘header’ or ‘supply’ tank that was fitted in the roof space or in some cases the ceiling. If these low-pressure systems are still in use, they...
  • Seventies Homes

    There were almost 280,000 homes built in the 1970s ranging from simple ‘spec homes’ through to larger and more expensive homes during the expansion of affluent suburbs. If they are still in original condition most people will want to...
  • New Zealand Roof Types

    New Zealand has a largely varied climate and our roofs need to be able to withstand strong winds, heavy rain, snow, hail, coastal conditions, and intense sunlight. It is important that all of roofs are designed and installed correctly by a...
  • Heating your home with a Woodburner

    Wood burners can be an extremely efficient form of heating when the owners have access to free wood. Without access to free wood, modern wood burners cost between 14-20 cents / kWh to run. If used correctly, they can be comparable to a heat pump...
  • The importance of kick-out flashings

    When performing our home inspections, one of the important flashing details we look for is a kickout flashing. Kickout flashings, also known as diverter flashings, are a unique type of flashing that divert rainwater away from the cladding and into...
  • Unauthorised Building Work

    Before the 1st of July 1992, building work required a Building Permit. The 1991 Building Act was implemented on the 1st of July 1992, and after the implementation of this Act, building work required a Building Consent. When building work from the...
  • Damp & Cold Homes

    In New Zealand, the condition of our housing is a major concern. It is estimated that about 49% of homes have issues with dampness and mould and a staggering 47% lack adequate insulation. Living in a damp or mouldy home can have significant...
  • Moisture Testing As Part Of The Inspection Process

    Moisture testing is a vital component of a property inspection, and is used to identify moisture ingress, leaking showers, faulty plumbing, and roof leaks. Our inspectors are extensively trained to identify signs of moisture ingress, potential...
  • Asbestos & How It Affects Us

    Asbestos is New Zealand’s leading killer in the workplace. Around 170 people die each year from asbestos-related diseases - the largest single cause of work related deaths.  When asbestos fibres are inhaled or ingested, which is most...
  • Requirements to consider when purchasing an investment property

    The Residential Tenancies Act 1986 requires landlords to provide and maintain rental properties in a reasonable state of repair and cleanliness. Recent amendments to the Act aimed at improving the standard of living have meant increased...
  • Spotting Problematic Cladding

    15 years have passed since New Zealand’s leaking home crisis first hit the headlines, rocking the housing market and causing buyers to become much more vigilant in their hunt for a suitable home. But problem cladding doesn’t end with...
  • 7 areas to investigate before purchasing your first home

    Current trends in the property market mean that some buyers are purchasing properties either unconditionally, or without any conditions attached to the sale and purchase agreement they enter into. Due to the competitive nature of the market,...
  • Calculating Replacement Insurance

    As building inspectors, we are often asked by house purchasers what price they should consider insuring their new property for under a replacement policy. This is often a difficult question to answer and in many cases an identical rebuild or...
  • Rot In Timbers Around The Home

    Almost all timber will deteriorate when exposed to moisture for long periods of time. Around the home, poor construction and lack of maintenance can speed up this process resulting in fungal decay, rot, and mould.   There are three broad...
  • The importance of bracing elements

    All houses are designed to withstand external forces imposed on them, and the two that are most frequently looked at under the Building Code when assessing Structure – B1 of the Code -  are Earthquake and Wind loadings. Both forces...
  • Understanding Thermal Imaging

    We have many investigative tools available at our disposal in evaluating the overall condition of the houses we inspect, and one of those that some of our inspector’s use, is a thermal camera. All objects above absolute zero or 0-degree...
  • Borer and your home

    As a professional building inspection company, one aspect of our inspection process involves identifying any evidence or risk of pest infestation. While this can range from rodents to insects, one of the most common in New Zealand homes is borer....
  • Lead-Based Paint: Identification, Risks, and Remediation

    Until 1965, many paints on the market contained high levels of lead. In the mid-60s the health risks that lead posed became more fully understood and oil-based paint containing red lead was banned, however it wasn’t until 1979 when the use...
  • Child Safety

    This is one of the important factors we consider when inspecting a property. There is the letter of the law to consider, and then there is also reasonable and practical considerations to be given when assessing the potential impacts for young...
  • Preparing your home for an earthquake

      New Zealand is located on the Pacific ring of fire between the Indo-Australian and Pacific tectonic plates, with a large number of faults, normally New Zealand experiences around 20,000 earthquakes annually. High risk zones are scattered...
  • A guide to choosing, installing, and maintaining smoke alarms

    In New Zealand there is a house fire approximately every three hours. These house fires move quickly and can consume a room in as little as 40 seconds, leaving little time for any occupants to escape.  Working smoke alarms can be your...
  • Dampness & Mould

    Dampness and mould are common throughout New Zealand homes, and a lot of the time this is as a result of everyday living. Mould thrives in damp conditions, and requires moisture to survive. While a small amount of mould is not likely to cause...
  • Swimming pools & the implications of the 2016 Amendment Act

    Summer is fast approaching, and that only means one thing- swimming!  However, if you are lucky enough to have a pool or spa on your property then you need to be aware of the changes to requirements for pool compliancy. The Building (Pools)...
  • Buyer Beware: Dux Qest Plumbing

    Home buyer beware: Dux Qest Plumbing Dux Qest is another product you need to be aware of if you’re in the market to purchase property. Notorious for spontaneously failing and causing leaks throughout homes in New Zealand, this is one...
  • Buyer Beware: Weatherside Cladding

    Home buyer beware: Weatherside Cladding As an inspection company that was established over ten years ago we have seen more than our fair share of properties. When speaking to home buyers we’re often surprised that they either,...
  • Tenants & Unrecorded Building Work

    Building work that was carried out prior to the 1st July 1992 required a building permit. For work that was completed after this date a building consent was required together with a Code Compliance Certificate for final sign off. Where work has...
  • Asbestos

    Asbestos is a naturally occurring fibre found in certain types of rock. It was used in a variety of building products including Decramastic tiles before 1985, Super 6 roofing, fibre cement claddings, shingles, fire rated putty, vinyl kitchen and...
  • 9 things to ask when booking a building inspection

    These days it seems every builder and his dog will claim to be a building inspector. As a long established building company we have seen many ‘inspectors’ come and go often leaving the industry when a client comes across an issue which...
  • Understanding Monolithic Cladding and the 'Leaky Home' Crisis

      Homes constructed using a variety of plaster clad system including solid plaster, Harditex, or polystyrene systems are commonly referred to as monolithic. Houses built particularly between the late 1980’s and 2004 are more...
  • The implications of changes to Methamphetamine testing Legislation

    Screening for Methamphetamine or P Contamination. On the 29th June 2017 NZS 8510 was introduced – its sets a new Standard for the testing and decontamination of methamphetamine contaminated properties. Previously we were guided by the...
  • Insulation of Rental Properties

    Over the last 6 – 12 months we are seeing a lot of rental properties coming onto the market for sale. These are typically a combination of singular rental houses, and blocks of 3 and 4 flats which have been owned by individual investors for...